Tag Archives: Squash

Curried Squash Tacos with Spicy Sour Cream

We can never get enough tacos here at PCH, and this one is a delightful twist on an old favorite. Who knew that packing so many flavors into one recipe would work so well? But curry, chorizo, radishes and butternut squash complement each other unexpectedly well creating a flurry of flavor.

photo of curried squash tacos

For tacos:

  • 10 small wheat or corn tortillas
  • ½ red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups butternut, diced into ½ inch pieces
  • 1 cup yellow potato, diced into ½ inch pieces
  • ½ lb. spicy chorizo sausage, removed from casing
  • 1 can black beans, drained
  • 1 bunch French breakfast radishes, thinly sliced
  • Handful cilantro
  • 2 T vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp. curry powder
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • ½ tsp. paprika

For sauce:

  • 6 oz sour cream
  • 4 green onion, finely diced
  • 1.5 T sriracha
  • ¼ tsp. kosher salt

Method:

Prepare veggies and preheat oven to 400 degrees. Toss potato, butternut squash, onion and spices with vegetable oil and bake for 20-30 minutes until browned and a knife is easily inserted.

Meanwhile, cook sausage in a skillet until browned (break into small pieces) then add black beans and cook until beans are warmed.

Prepare sauce by mixing sour cream, green onion, salt, and sriracha. Serve roasted veggies, beans and sausage on warmed tortilla, topped with sour cream, radishes, and cilantro. Enjoy!

Warm Fall Salad with Goat Cheese and Caramelized Acorn Squash

Hi Harvesters,

We hope you’re ready to start enjoying the bounty of new things that the fall season is bringing our way! Try out this hearty salad with nutrient-rich kale, flavorful squash, and some of those delicious Washington pears. Kale Salad With Carmelized Acorn Squash

Ingredients:

  • 1 large acorn squash, peeled and diced (into ½ inch pieces)
  • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 bartlett pear, sliced
  • 1 bunch green kale, torn into bite-sized pieces
  • 2 T. olive oil
  • 1 Tsp. kosher salt
  • 1 tsp. paprika
  • 2 tsp. brown sugar
  • 4 oz. chevre
  • ¼ cup roasted sunflower seeds

Method:

Prepare all ingredients. In large skillet, preheat olive oil on medium-high heat and add onion. Cook for about five minutes until onions become translucent, then add diced squash. Cook for another 7-10 minutes until onions and squash begin to brown, then add paprika, ½ tsp. salt, and brown sugar and cook until sugar is dissolved, stirring constantly (another few minutes).

Add kale and the rest of the salt (and a little more olive oil if necessary) and toss until kale is mostly wilted and turns a very vibrant green. Transfer to serving plates immediately and top with hefty amount of goat cheese, slices of pear, and sunflower seeds. Enjoy!

Serves 4

Delicata Squash Chips

Hi Harvesters,

The leaves are changing and we think this means fall is coming, and you know what that means! Winter squash is on the way. To get you in the mood to take advantage of this fall treat, here’s a recipe for an easy baked chip you can make with delicata squash.

IMG_3222

Ingredients

  • 3 medium delicata squash, thinly sliced with a mandoline
  • 1 T. olive oil 1 tsp kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • ½ tsp. paprika
  • ¼ tsp. curry powder

Directions

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Cut the end off the delicata and remove seeds. Use a mandoline to thinly slice squash. Toss with olive oil, salt, paprika, and curry powder.

Place in a single layer on a baking sheet lined with parchment. Bake for 40 minutes to an hour until crisp and brown. Check every now and then to remove chips that are done (some will take longer than others). Enjoy!

Happy New Year! Time for a New Recipe

Hello Harvesters!

It’s been a while since we’ve had a new post on this blog, and we are happy to be back. We all took a nice two week vacation on the weeks of Christmas and New Years to give our drivers a break from the long night shifts. We hope you were able to have some time to relax and some good family time.

This week’s recipe from PCH friend Kayla Waldorf is for an Italian-style stuffed manicotti, which is a bit like lasagna, but with tube-shaped pasta instead of large sheets. It also incorporates a lot of veggies that we have had available recently here at the Harvest. Enjoy!

Winter Vegetable Stuffed Manicotti

IMG_0126

2 cups white mushrooms, cubed

2 cups butternut squash, cubed

3 small onions

½ cup hazelnuts, toasted, chopped

3 large handfuls fresh spinach

1 12oz can diced tomato

12 oz ricotta cheese

1 package manicotti shells

1 teaspoon oregano

¼ teaspoon nutmeg

1 teaspoon salt (plus more to taste)

1 teaspoon black pepper (plus more to taste)

2 tablespoon butter

½ cup chopped, toasted hazelnuts

Parmesan cheese for topping (about 3 oz. grated)

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Prepare manicotti as directed, but on the al dente side (because they will be baked in the oven later on). Cube butternut squash, cook in boiling water until a knife can be easily inserted.

While the manicotti and butternut squash cooks, dice onions and cube mushrooms. In a large pan, sauté onions in butter over medium heat, stirring constantly, until they begin to caramelize (about 15 minutes) add mushrooms and cook for an additional 5 to 10 minutes until mushrooms soften.

To prepare filling, blend canned tomatoes, cooked squash and stir in spices (nutmeg, oregano, salt, and pepper). Remove about 1/3 of the mixture to top the manicotti and blend the rest with ricotta cheese. Dump the cheese mixture into the pan with the mushroom and onion. Stir in 2/3 of the chopped hazelnuts and then mix in spinach over low heat until spinach begins to wilt.

Spread a thin layer of squash sauce on the bottom of a large casserole dish. Prepare manicotti by stuffing with filling generously and place in the dish. Cover with the remaining sauce and grate Parmesan over the top. I used about 3 oz. but you can use more or less depending on personal preference. Bake in oven for 35-45 minutes until cheese begins to brown. Sprinkle remaining hazelnuts over the top and serve. Enjoy!

Enjoy!

Original recipe and photo for PCH by Kayla Waldorf

Sign up today!

 

 

Delicious Stuffed Squash Entree

This week’s recipe from our good friend Kayla Waldorf brings together three of our favorite foods- caramelized onions, sauteed mushrooms, and sweet winter squash. This is a hearty, filling entree for a winter meal with the family.

Chevre & Brown Rice Stuffed Acorn Squash with Sautéed Mushrooms

IMG_1529

Ingredients

2 acorn squash, halved

1 ½ cups brown rice

3 cups veggie broth

8 oz. Crimini mushrooms, cut into small cubes

1 large onion, diced

½ cup walnuts, chopped

3 tbsp. balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp. butter

4 oz Chevre (3 for the stuffing, 1 for the top)

 

Method

Preheat oven to 375. Halve acorn squash and remove seeds. Place upside down in glass baking dish, fill with ¼ inch water, and loosely cover with tin foil. Bake for 40 minutes.

 

While squash is baking, cook rice. Rinse rice and place in pot, cover with 3 cups veggie broth and bring to a boil. Once rice is boiling, reduce heat and simmer for 20-30 minutes until rice is tender (do not stir).

 

While rice is cooking, preheat large pan on medium heat and melt butter. Once pan is preheated, add onions. Stir constantly until onions caramelize (they will turn a rich brown color and become very translucent). Once onions are caramelized, add 3 tablespoons balsamic and cook (stirring continuously) until mushrooms are soft and vinegar is thick. Feel free to add more vinegar if you like the flavor. Mix in chopped walnut, 3 oz. chevre and about salt and cayenne pepper to taste.

 

When squash is done, remove from oven and increase temperature to 400. Flip over so the bowl-shaped side is facing up (cut off the bottoms to create a flat surface). Distribute stuffing evenly between squash and top with the remainder of the chevre. Bake for another 15 minutes until the cheese on top begins to brown. Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for Pacific Coast Harvest by Kayla Waldorf

 

Click below and sign up today!

PCH_logo

Sweet Harvest Cornbread for Breakfast or Dessert

Hello Harvesters

This week’s recipe is for a delicious bread that you can make with your winter squash and pumpkin pie spices.

Sweet Harvest Cornbread with Pecan Streusel

IMG_1464

Ingredients

Batter

1.5 cups flour

1 cup cornmeal

1 cup pureed squash

¼ teaspoon nutmeg

¼ teaspoon ginger

¼ teaspoon cloves

½ teaspoon cinnamon

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

½ tsp. vanilla

2 tbsp. maple syrup

1/3 cup brown sugar

2 tablespoon cane sugar

1 cup buttermilk

¼ melted coconut oil + 1 tablespoon for pan

2 apples peeled and chopped

 

Streusel

3 tablespoons melted coconut oil

¼ brown sugar

½ cup chopped pecans

¼ flour

 

Method:

 

Preheat oven to 400. Peel and chop at least 1 cup winter squash into 1 inch pieces (most anything will do, but I would avoid spaghetti squash). Place in pan and cover with ½ inch water. Bring to boil and cook until very soft (about 10 minutes). Puree* and set aside.

 

Combine dry ingredients in large mixing bowl (including sugar). In a smaller bowl, combine buttermilk, coconut oil, maple syrup, vanilla and egg. Add wet ingredients to dry, then fold in squash puree and chopped apples.

 

Coat skillet with melted coconut oil and pour in batter. Combine all streusel ingredients in small bowl then sprinkle over batter. Bake for 40-55 minutes until toothpick comes out clean (remember the apples will keep it moist, so it might take longer than expected).

 

*if you have a lot of extra squash making a puree and keeping it frozen for baking/soup/etc. is a great way to preserve it

 

Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for PCH by Kayla Waldorf

Click below and sign up today!

PCH_logo

 

A Cornucopia of Cucurbita (Say that 6 Times Fast)

Hello Harvesters

Pacific Northwest produce lovers have a love-hate relationship with our squash. Towards the end of the summer, it can be a bit overwhelming trying to consume all the zucchini and yellow summer squash coming out of our gardens without wasting any. It’s the season of trying to dump as much summer squash as possible into your neighbors hands while trying to avoid taking theirs, like a big game of hot potato (or hot squash, as the case may be).

"Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence - "Courge musquée" squash gourd" by fr:User:Spedona - fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence – “Courge musquée” squash gourd” by fr:User:Spedona – fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

 

Fortunately, the middle of September is when we start to see a transition from summer squash, like zucchini, patty, and yellow squash (generally of the species Cucurbita pepo), to more winter squash varieties like butternut and acorn (in the US, mostly C. moschata, with some C. pepo mixed in for good measure). Winter squash differ from summer squash in that they generally mature to the point where they have a hard and inedible outer rind before they are picked and eaten. This helps these hardy plants survive the colder weather of Cascadian autumn and winter. Their different physiology also gives them a different taste and different cooking applications. While zucchini is best sliced and sautéed (at least in my opinion), nothing beats a good mashed butternut squash with honey and butter.

"Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2" by George Chernilevsky - Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2” by George Chernilevsky – Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

 

Thanks to their hard outer rinds, winter squash varieties have extremely long shelf lives. If you buy a prime acorn squash in good condition, it can keep for up to two months if it is stored in a cool (around 50 degrees F), dry place away from direct sunlight. Just make sure not to store them in a refrigerator, as this actually makes the squash go bad more quickly. This comes in very handy for busy Seattleites who don’t want to waste their produce, and makes winter squash a great standby food that you can save for when you really need it.

 

Keep an eye out for this week’s recipe, which includes butternut squash (but I won’t give it away yet!)

 

Happy harvesting.

 

 

Click below and sign up today!

PCH_logo

Carrot, Delicata and Rutabaga Soup

Ingredients:Image

  • 3-4 carrots, finely chopped
  • 1 medium rutabaga, finely chopped
  • 1 delicata squash, finely chopped
  • 1 large onion (or leek)
  • 2 tablespoons corn flour mixed well with 1 cup water
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Chicken or vegetable broth (optional)

 Directions:

  • Place the chopped carrots, squash and rutabaga in a medium but deep saucepan.
  • Fill it up with water or broth until vegetables are covered. Bring contents to a boil then reduce the heat to low and simmer until everything is soft.
  • Use a masher and slowly mash the vegetables into puree form. Stir constantly until it is all mixed well and smooth.
  • Add in the corn flour and water mixture. Keep simmering until the soup is thickened and pasty.
  • Add in salt to taste. Sprinkle ground black pepper and parsley over soup and serve.

Acorn Squash Curry

Ingredients: acorn curry

  • 1 acorn squash
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3 carrots, peeled and cut into ½” chunks
  • 2 butterball potatoes, cut into 1/2” chunks
  • ½ onion, sliced
  • 1 (13.5 oz) can coconut milk
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons curry powder
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chili pepper flakes
  • 1 tablespoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 400°F.  Halve an acorn squash, scoop out the seeds, and set skin side up on a jelly roll pan coated with vegetable oil.  Bake for 30 minutes and let cool.  Peel, and cut into cubes.
  • In a large pot, place acorn squash, carrots, potatoes, onion, coconut milk, water, curry powder, soy sauce, chili pepper flakes, turmeric, sea salt (to taste), and sugar over medium heat.  Stir to combine. After about 20 minutes, turn heat to low.
  • Cook until potatoes are fork-tender.  Serve with brown or white rice.

Butternut Squash Risotto

 

Ingredients:Image

 

  • 2 ounces bacon
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 cup short grain rice, such as arborio or carnaroli
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 medium butternut squash, halved, seeded, peeled and cut into ½” chunks
  • 1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped
  • ¼ cup cream

Directions:

  • Cook bacon in large saucepan over medium-high heat until fat renders and is browned and almost crisp. Using slotted spoon or tongs, transfer to medium bowl.
  • Add oil to same saucepan, then onion and garlic; cook until onion is translucent, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Add rice; stir 1 minute.
  • Add hot broth; increase heat and bring to boil. Add squash and sage; reduce heat to medium and simmer until rice is tender but still firm to bite and mixture is creamy, stirring often, about 15 minutes.
  • Stir in cream and bacon. Season to taste with salt and pepper.