Tag Archives: organic produce

Caramelized Garlic and Chevre Hors d’oeuvres

Hello Harvesters,

Here’s an hors d’oeuvre full of fresh flavors and of course, nutritional value.

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Ingredients

  • 2 heads garlic peeled
  • 1 cup water + more
  • 1 T. olive oil
  • 1 T. balsamic vinegar
  • 1 T. maple syrup
  • 1 tsp. fresh rosemary, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Tomato or cucumber, sliced
  • 1 loaf sourdough, cut into 1 inch slices
  • 3 oz. chevre

For caramelized garlic:

Fill a small saucepan with salted water and bring to a boil. Add whole garlic cloves and cook for three minutes until soft. Drain and wipe pan clean.

Heat olive oil on medium-high heat with garlic cloves, and cook for 2-3 minutes until cloves are golden brown. Add one cup water and one tablespoon balsamic vinegar, bring to simmer and cook until most of the water is evaporated. Add maple syrup and rosemary and season with salt and pepper to taste, cook for a few more minutes until remaining liquid has thickened. Remove from heat and use back of a spoon to crush so garlic is spreadable.

Assembly: Set oven to broil. Slice sourdough and place in oven until golden brown (5 minutes or so). Top with chevre and desired amount of caramelized garlic and finish with tomato or cucumber and a sprinkling of salt and pepper. Serve immediately. Enjoy!

Curried Squash Tacos with Spicy Sour Cream

We can never get enough tacos here at PCH, and this one is a delightful twist on an old favorite. Who knew that packing so many flavors into one recipe would work so well? But curry, chorizo, radishes and butternut squash complement each other unexpectedly well creating a flurry of flavor.

photo of curried squash tacos

For tacos:

  • 10 small wheat or corn tortillas
  • ½ red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups butternut, diced into ½ inch pieces
  • 1 cup yellow potato, diced into ½ inch pieces
  • ½ lb. spicy chorizo sausage, removed from casing
  • 1 can black beans, drained
  • 1 bunch French breakfast radishes, thinly sliced
  • Handful cilantro
  • 2 T vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp. curry powder
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • ½ tsp. paprika

For sauce:

  • 6 oz sour cream
  • 4 green onion, finely diced
  • 1.5 T sriracha
  • ¼ tsp. kosher salt

Method:

Prepare veggies and preheat oven to 400 degrees. Toss potato, butternut squash, onion and spices with vegetable oil and bake for 20-30 minutes until browned and a knife is easily inserted.

Meanwhile, cook sausage in a skillet until browned (break into small pieces) then add black beans and cook until beans are warmed.

Prepare sauce by mixing sour cream, green onion, salt, and sriracha. Serve roasted veggies, beans and sausage on warmed tortilla, topped with sour cream, radishes, and cilantro. Enjoy!

Best-Ever Kale Salad

Hi Harvesters!

This week we’re bringing you a recipe for a kale salad to take advantage of this healthy and popular green. The ingredients list is pretty simple, but he result is deliciously satisfying. Try it out and let us know what you think!

 For Dressing:

  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper, ground

For Salad:

  • 1 bunch green kale, washed and massaged
  • ½ cup slivered blanched almonds, toasted
  • ½ cup parmesan, finely grated

Instructions

Combine lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, salt, and pepper and set aside. Wash and tear kale and vigorously rub the leaves to break down cell walls (this will make the kale much less tough).

Toast almonds on medium high heat in a skillet, stirring constantly, until golden brown.

Toss kale, cheese, and almonds and serve. Enjoy!

Sweet Caramelized Banana Bread for Breakfast or Dessert

Hello Harvesters!

We’re really excited that spring is just around the corner. The days are getting a bit longer, and we are breathing a sigh of relief as the long cold winter comes to an end. Keep your chins up through the rest of the February gloom, and try not to think of the disaster that was the Superbowl… Sorry 12s.

This week’s recipe from Friend of PCH Kayla Waldorf is for an absolutely delicious banana-carrot bread with shredded coconut and rum glaze. It’s a more complicated twist on a classic breakfast treat, and I can tell you that it is nothing short of spectacular with a cup of BioWilly’s Beans Wedding Roast. Give this a try, and I guarantee you won’t regret it.

Caramelized Banana and Carrot Bread with Rum Glaze

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Ingredients

For banana bread:

3 very ripe bananas, 1 mashed, 2 sliced

1 tbsp. butter

2 tbsp. brown sugar

2 pinches salt

1 cup granulated sugar

1 2/3 cups all purpose flour

1 tsp. baking soda

¼ tsp. ground cinnamon

2 eggs

2 Tbsp. whipping cream

½ cup coconut oil, melted

1 cup carrots, grated

2/3 cup walnuts, chopped

 

For rum glaze:

½ cup brown sugar

¼ cup butter (½ stick)

1/8 cup light rum

1/8 cup water

¼ cup sweetened shredded coconut

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 350. In a small pan, heat butter on medium-high heat until melted. Add 2 sliced bananas (about ½ inch thick) and brown sugar and a couple large pinches of salt. Stir continuously for 5-10 minutes until bananas start to break down and liquid thickens and turns caramel colored.

In medium sized bowl whisk together flour, baking soda, and cinnamon. In large bowl, combine melted coconut oil, eggs, sugar, whipping cream, and 1 smashed bananas as well as the caramelized bananas (should amount to around 1 ½ cups bananas total). Slowly add in dry ingredients until batter is smooth. Fold in carrots and walnuts. Prepare 2 bread pans with butter and divide batter into each (or 1 9 inch pie pan). Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour until a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean.

To make glaze, combine brown sugar, coconut, butter, rum, and water in small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Once at a boil, stir constantly for 5-10 minutes until glaze barely starts to thicken, then remove and let cool.

When ready to serve, poke small holes in the top of the bread and pour desired amount of glaze over the top. Serve warm.

Original recipe and photo for Pacific Coast Harvest by Kayla Waldorf

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Candied Hazelnut & Pear Salad with Orange Vinaigrette

Hello all

This week we have a delicious and exotic salad with pears, candied walnuts and hazelnuts, and Humboldt Fog cheese. Give it a try and you won’t regret it!

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Ingredients

1 ripe Bartlett pear

2 heads red butter leaf lettuce

3 oz. Humboldt Fog cheese

Candied Hazelnuts

2 cups hazelnuts (or other nuts if desired)

¼ cup sugar

1 tbsp. water

¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Vinaigrette

1 orange

1 tbsp. balsamic (plus more)

1 tbsp. olive oil

¼ teaspoon salt

Method:

Preheat oven to 300. Prepare baking sheet with butter. In a small saucepan combine sugar, water, and cayenne over medium heat. Bring to a boil then remove from heat and stir in hazelnuts and immediately spread over baking sheet. Sprinkle with kosher salt and bake for 20 minutes, stirring every 5.

To make vinaigrette, juice orange and add balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and salt. Toss desired amount with lettuce and divide onto 4 plates. Slice pear and lay a few slices along each salad. Sprinkle with Humboldt fog and candied hazelnuts. Drizzle with balsamic for serving. Enjoy!

 

Original Recipe and Photo by Kayla Waldorf

 

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Two Thanksgiving Myths Dispelled

Hello all!

This is the last blog post before Thanksgiving 2014. We hope you all have plans for a wonderful and safe holiday filled with joyful family reunions and friendship. Try not to let the stress of cooking for everyone get you down. We thought we would help you impress your guests this year by arming you with the facts to dispel two common Thanksgiving myths.

 

Public Domain Image via USDA

Public Domain Image via USDA

Turkey Does Not Make You Sleepy

 

It’s a oft-repeated trope of Thanksgiving that the amino acid tryptophan in the turkey makes everyone drowsy after the meal. Tryptophan is an important amino acid, and it is necessary for your body to manufacture serotonin, one of the neurotransmitters primarily responsible for mood and sleep. Low levels of serotonin cause depression, anxiety, and mood swings. However, turkey is no higher in tryptophan than other poultry meats, and actually contains less than chicken. The real reason you get sleepy after a Thanksgiving meal is that you’ve just stuffed yourself full of a massive portion of food. Blood is rushing to your stomach and your body is expending energy to digest all of that delicious food, so your body makes you feel tired so you don’t over-exert yourself while digesting. Imagine a boa constrictor that has just swallowed a large animal. It’s certainly not going to be doing much exercise after a meal like that.

 

You May Never Have Tasted a Yam

 

The word “yam” is colloquially used as a synonym for sweet potatoes. Most people refer to the long orange-skinned potatoes in the grocery store as “yams”. However, yams and sweet potatoes are not even distantly related. To complicate matters further, potatoes themselves are not related to either yams or sweet potatoes. Potatoes are in the Solanaceae family, yams are in the Dioscoreaceae family (say that one five times fast), and sweet potatoes are in the Convolvulaceae family. Potatoes and sweet potatoes are both dicots, meaning they have two embryonic seed leaves, while yams are monocots (they have only one embryonic seed leaf). This means that yams and sweet potatoes are as distantly related as two flowering plants can be.

 

By Llez (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Llez (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Yams are common in Africa- the top 8 of the top 10 world producers are African countries, followed by Papua New Guinea and Colombia. They are popular ingredients in African and Carribbean cuisines, due to their flexibility in culinary applications. They can be baked, grilled, barbecued, smoked, boiled, fried, roasted, or made into pie. Unfortunately, true yams are not nearly as common in the US, where they have been overtaken by sweet potatoes as a more common substitute.

 

Have a wonderful and safe holiday, everyone!

 

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Delicious Stuffed Squash Entree

This week’s recipe from our good friend Kayla Waldorf brings together three of our favorite foods- caramelized onions, sauteed mushrooms, and sweet winter squash. This is a hearty, filling entree for a winter meal with the family.

Chevre & Brown Rice Stuffed Acorn Squash with Sautéed Mushrooms

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Ingredients

2 acorn squash, halved

1 ½ cups brown rice

3 cups veggie broth

8 oz. Crimini mushrooms, cut into small cubes

1 large onion, diced

½ cup walnuts, chopped

3 tbsp. balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp. butter

4 oz Chevre (3 for the stuffing, 1 for the top)

 

Method

Preheat oven to 375. Halve acorn squash and remove seeds. Place upside down in glass baking dish, fill with ¼ inch water, and loosely cover with tin foil. Bake for 40 minutes.

 

While squash is baking, cook rice. Rinse rice and place in pot, cover with 3 cups veggie broth and bring to a boil. Once rice is boiling, reduce heat and simmer for 20-30 minutes until rice is tender (do not stir).

 

While rice is cooking, preheat large pan on medium heat and melt butter. Once pan is preheated, add onions. Stir constantly until onions caramelize (they will turn a rich brown color and become very translucent). Once onions are caramelized, add 3 tablespoons balsamic and cook (stirring continuously) until mushrooms are soft and vinegar is thick. Feel free to add more vinegar if you like the flavor. Mix in chopped walnut, 3 oz. chevre and about salt and cayenne pepper to taste.

 

When squash is done, remove from oven and increase temperature to 400. Flip over so the bowl-shaped side is facing up (cut off the bottoms to create a flat surface). Distribute stuffing evenly between squash and top with the remainder of the chevre. Bake for another 15 minutes until the cheese on top begins to brown. Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for Pacific Coast Harvest by Kayla Waldorf

 

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Parsnips: the Most Delicious Root Veggie Since Carrots

We’re coming back around to parsnip season here in the northwest, and we are super excited! Parsnips (Pastinaca sativa) are a delicious root vegetable with a tender, fibrous texture and a sweet flavor. It’s a close relative of parsley and carrots (to which they bear many similarities in taste and shape). Parsnips are delicious in a big mixed veggie roast with salt and pepper, or roasted alone with some curry powder. They also make excellent addition to stews- their rich, sweet flavor adds depth and complexity to the base. Parsnip fries are delicious twist on sweet-potato or carrot fries.

Check out some of Martha Stewart’s recipes for parsnips.

During the height of the Roman Empire, parsnips were prized as a source of sugar and dietary staple high in starch. Emperor Tiberius is reported to have accepted some of Germany’s tribute payment to Rome in parsnips, illustrating the high status the vegetable held. At the time, carrots were still usually white, so there was some trouble distinguishing between carrots and parsnips.

By Zyance (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Zyance (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

What’s the difference between a root veggie and a tuber?

In America, the parsnip has not been quite so highly valued, having been replaced by sugar cane and beets as a source of sugar and by potatoes as a source of starch. However, roasted parsnip is still a central part of many folks’ Christmas dinners, and they remain ubiquitous in grocery stores and farmers markets across the country.

What are your favorite parsnip recipes?

 

 

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Sweet Harvest Cornbread for Breakfast or Dessert

Hello Harvesters

This week’s recipe is for a delicious bread that you can make with your winter squash and pumpkin pie spices.

Sweet Harvest Cornbread with Pecan Streusel

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Ingredients

Batter

1.5 cups flour

1 cup cornmeal

1 cup pureed squash

¼ teaspoon nutmeg

¼ teaspoon ginger

¼ teaspoon cloves

½ teaspoon cinnamon

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

½ tsp. vanilla

2 tbsp. maple syrup

1/3 cup brown sugar

2 tablespoon cane sugar

1 cup buttermilk

¼ melted coconut oil + 1 tablespoon for pan

2 apples peeled and chopped

 

Streusel

3 tablespoons melted coconut oil

¼ brown sugar

½ cup chopped pecans

¼ flour

 

Method:

 

Preheat oven to 400. Peel and chop at least 1 cup winter squash into 1 inch pieces (most anything will do, but I would avoid spaghetti squash). Place in pan and cover with ½ inch water. Bring to boil and cook until very soft (about 10 minutes). Puree* and set aside.

 

Combine dry ingredients in large mixing bowl (including sugar). In a smaller bowl, combine buttermilk, coconut oil, maple syrup, vanilla and egg. Add wet ingredients to dry, then fold in squash puree and chopped apples.

 

Coat skillet with melted coconut oil and pour in batter. Combine all streusel ingredients in small bowl then sprinkle over batter. Bake for 40-55 minutes until toothpick comes out clean (remember the apples will keep it moist, so it might take longer than expected).

 

*if you have a lot of extra squash making a puree and keeping it frozen for baking/soup/etc. is a great way to preserve it

 

Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for PCH by Kayla Waldorf

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Pear Galette with Rosemary Crust and Maple Whipped Cream

This week’s recipe is for a tasty rustic dessert with the delicious pears that have are coming in to season. You can use any type of pear, but we recommend Red D’Anjou or Star Krimson for taste and aesthetics.

 

Ingredients

Filling:

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Pear Galette with Rosemary Crust and Maple Whipped Cream

4 almost ripe D’Anjou pears (other varieties will work too)

½ cup brown sugar

½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (combo of ground ginger, nutmeg, and cinnamon)

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Crust:

Choose your favorite piecrust recipe (it’s more about the method than the recipe). I like to use Seattle local Robin Wehl’s award-winning recipe that can be found here: http://www.crossroadsbellevue.com/Content/Downloads/2012%20Berry%20Pie%20Winners%20Recipes.pdf

2 teaspoons finely diced fresh rosemary

1 egg (for brushing)

Whipped Cream:

2 cups heavy whipping cream

2 tablespoons maple syrup

 

Method

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Prepare pie dough by mixing dry ingredients and rosemary in Cuisinart (or by hand). Dice butter/shortening and place in freezer until frozen. Add butter/shortening to dry ingredients and mix until grainy. Prepare cold water by adding ice and add to dough until dough just comes together (be careful not to pour the ice into the mixture but the colder the water is the better). Knead dough a few times until dough comes together, but if there are butter chunks or floury parts, that is okay. Never over-mix! Wrap dough in saran wrap and place in refrigerator for 20-30 minutes.

Prepare filling by coring pears and cutting into ½ inch slices. Mix in a large bowl with spices, lemon juice, and sugar.

When pie dough is cool, roll out by unwrapping saran wrap and placing another piece over the top. Roll between the two pieces of saran wrap until dough reaches desired thickness (this will help you to handle the dough as little as possible). Remove saran wrap and place on cookie sheet. Pile filling into center of dough and pinch and fold dough up around the sides (you want the dough up about 2 inches over the filling so it doesn’t spill out). Pinch any holes together and brush with egg. Bake for 30-45 minutes until crust is golden brown (check the bottom to make sure it’s done through). Don’t worry about making it pretty, it’s meant to have a rustic aesthetic.

Whip the cream until peaks form and fold in maple syrup.

Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for PCH by Kayla Waldorf

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