Tag Archives: organic acorn squash

Delicious Stuffed Squash Entree

This week’s recipe from our good friend Kayla Waldorf brings together three of our favorite foods- caramelized onions, sauteed mushrooms, and sweet winter squash. This is a hearty, filling entree for a winter meal with the family.

Chevre & Brown Rice Stuffed Acorn Squash with Sautéed Mushrooms

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Ingredients

2 acorn squash, halved

1 ½ cups brown rice

3 cups veggie broth

8 oz. Crimini mushrooms, cut into small cubes

1 large onion, diced

½ cup walnuts, chopped

3 tbsp. balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp. butter

4 oz Chevre (3 for the stuffing, 1 for the top)

 

Method

Preheat oven to 375. Halve acorn squash and remove seeds. Place upside down in glass baking dish, fill with ¼ inch water, and loosely cover with tin foil. Bake for 40 minutes.

 

While squash is baking, cook rice. Rinse rice and place in pot, cover with 3 cups veggie broth and bring to a boil. Once rice is boiling, reduce heat and simmer for 20-30 minutes until rice is tender (do not stir).

 

While rice is cooking, preheat large pan on medium heat and melt butter. Once pan is preheated, add onions. Stir constantly until onions caramelize (they will turn a rich brown color and become very translucent). Once onions are caramelized, add 3 tablespoons balsamic and cook (stirring continuously) until mushrooms are soft and vinegar is thick. Feel free to add more vinegar if you like the flavor. Mix in chopped walnut, 3 oz. chevre and about salt and cayenne pepper to taste.

 

When squash is done, remove from oven and increase temperature to 400. Flip over so the bowl-shaped side is facing up (cut off the bottoms to create a flat surface). Distribute stuffing evenly between squash and top with the remainder of the chevre. Bake for another 15 minutes until the cheese on top begins to brown. Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for Pacific Coast Harvest by Kayla Waldorf

 

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A Cornucopia of Cucurbita (Say that 6 Times Fast)

Hello Harvesters

Pacific Northwest produce lovers have a love-hate relationship with our squash. Towards the end of the summer, it can be a bit overwhelming trying to consume all the zucchini and yellow summer squash coming out of our gardens without wasting any. It’s the season of trying to dump as much summer squash as possible into your neighbors hands while trying to avoid taking theirs, like a big game of hot potato (or hot squash, as the case may be).

"Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence - "Courge musquée" squash gourd" by fr:User:Spedona - fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence – “Courge musquée” squash gourd” by fr:User:Spedona – fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

 

Fortunately, the middle of September is when we start to see a transition from summer squash, like zucchini, patty, and yellow squash (generally of the species Cucurbita pepo), to more winter squash varieties like butternut and acorn (in the US, mostly C. moschata, with some C. pepo mixed in for good measure). Winter squash differ from summer squash in that they generally mature to the point where they have a hard and inedible outer rind before they are picked and eaten. This helps these hardy plants survive the colder weather of Cascadian autumn and winter. Their different physiology also gives them a different taste and different cooking applications. While zucchini is best sliced and sautéed (at least in my opinion), nothing beats a good mashed butternut squash with honey and butter.

"Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2" by George Chernilevsky - Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2” by George Chernilevsky – Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

 

Thanks to their hard outer rinds, winter squash varieties have extremely long shelf lives. If you buy a prime acorn squash in good condition, it can keep for up to two months if it is stored in a cool (around 50 degrees F), dry place away from direct sunlight. Just make sure not to store them in a refrigerator, as this actually makes the squash go bad more quickly. This comes in very handy for busy Seattleites who don’t want to waste their produce, and makes winter squash a great standby food that you can save for when you really need it.

 

Keep an eye out for this week’s recipe, which includes butternut squash (but I won’t give it away yet!)

 

Happy harvesting.

 

 

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