Tag Archives: local beets

Root Veggie 101

Hello Harvesters

As the cooler weather approaches, we are going to start seeing an influx of root vegetables into the harvest boxes. Whether it’s beet, celery root, turnip, or rutabaga, these hardy foods thrive in the winter because of their resistance to cold. Some of our less adventurous friends express some disappointment when root veggie season rolls around- “awww, rutabaga again?” – but here at PCH we think root veggies are awesome. All it takes is a bit of root veggie know-how to keep these foods interesting over the long winter. Let’s start with the basics.

 

The Beet

"Beets-Bundle" by Evan-Amos - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Zero, Public Domain Dedication via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beets-Bundle.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Beets-Bundle.jpg

“Beets-Bundle” by Evan-Amos – Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Zero, Public Domain Dedication via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beets-Bundle.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Beets-Bundle.jpg

Beets are sweet, juicy root veggies that have the consistency slightly thicker than a potato, but with a much sweeter taste. Beets are the primary ingredient in the traditional Ukrainian soup called borscht, a stew-like dish with beets, potatoes, carrots, and beef or pork broth. Boiled, cubed, and chilled beets also make excellent additions to spinach salads in the fall, and beet greens can also be eaten sautéed. They come in many varieties, including red, gold, and “Chiogga”, the type that exhibits beautiful red and white spirals when sliced in cross-section. Be careful when cooking with red beets, as the juice can put bright magenta stain on your clothing.

 

The Turnip

By thebittenword.com (http://www.flickr.com/photos/galant/2622027467/) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By thebittenword.com (http://www.flickr.com/photos/galant/2622027467/) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

 The turnip is a white and pink taproot of Brassica rapa. It grows partially under and above ground, with the underground part remaining white and the above ground part turning colors, usually pink. In southern cuisine, turnip greens are sometimes eaten boiled like collard greens. Turnips have a spicy kick to them, almost like a radish, and this can be a great addition to a beef stew.

 

The Rutabaga

By pin add (Swede (The Vegetable)  Uploaded by nesnad) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By pin add (Swede (The Vegetable) Uploaded by nesnad) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Rutabagas look quite similar to turnips, but the colored top of the root tends to be a darker, more muted purple rather than pink, and the white subterranean part of the root tends to be a more yellowish cream color. The flavor of a rutabaga is milder than a turnip, with less radish-like kick. Rutabagas are good for adding substance to soups and stews, or for roasting on their own.

 

Celery Root

By Jamain (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Jamain (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Celery root (or celeriac) is a variety of celery that is grown for its large edible root. It has a spicy, bitter celery taste, but a texture more like a turnip or a rutabaga. Celeriac makes an excellent addition to stocks, and tastes great sliced thin and roasted with salt.

 

 

Let us know which is your favorite root veggie!

 

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Delicious Bruschetta Snacks

Hello Harvesters

Happy first week of August to you all. This week’s recipe is the first in a new series by local Seattle food enthusiast Kayla Waldorf. She will be creating new original weekly recipes using the ingredients we will be delivering each week. For this week, she has created a delicious recipe to serve as hors d’ouevres at your next party or to accompany a larger entree. Enjoy!

Bruschetta with Roasted Apricot & Beet Relish

Photo by Kayla Waldorf for Pacific Coast Harvest

Photo by Kayla Waldorf for Pacific Coast Harvest

Ingredients

2 large beets

3 medium apricots, pitted and halved

1 medium onion

1 tbsp brown sugar

2 tbsp butter

½ tsp coarse sea salt

1 baguette

8 oz. fresh mozzarella or burrata

Balsamic vinegar to taste

Directions

-Preheat oven to 400. Cooking time approx. 1 hour.

-Wash and individually wrap beets loosely in tin foil.

-Place beets on baking sheet in oven, set timer for 30 minutes.

-While beets begin to roast, prepare apricots and onions. Halve apricots and put small dab of butter in center, sprinkle with brown sugar. Cut onion horizontally into 1 inch slices (onion ring style). Put small dab of butter on either side of slice, sprinkle with sea salt.
-After 30 minutes, place onions on baking sheet with beets and return to oven for 15 minutes.

-After 15 minutes, place apricots on sheet with onions and beets and return to oven for 15 minutes. When done, apricots & onions will be golden brown and beets will be soft enough to easily insert a knife.

-After 15 minutes, remove apricots, beets, and onions and let cool for 15-20 minutes until cool enough to handle. Once cool, remove skin from beets (should come off easily by hand). Place all ingredients in refrigerator for 20 minutes until cool.

To make relish: dice all ingredients into ¼ inch cubes.

-Place in a small bowl and mix together with ¼ tsp salt.

To make bruschetta: set oven to broil. Cut baguette into 1-2 inch slices and brush with butter, place on baking sheet and insert into oven.

– Broil until butter is bubbling and edges are golden brown. Remove from oven.

– Slice mozzarella or burrata into ½ slices large enough to cover baguette pieces. Place on toasted baguette and pile 1 spoonful of relish.

-Drizzle with balsamic to taste and sprinkle with sea salt.

 

Enjoy!

 

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