Tag Archives: butternut squash

A Cornucopia of Cucurbita (Say that 6 Times Fast)

Hello Harvesters

Pacific Northwest produce lovers have a love-hate relationship with our squash. Towards the end of the summer, it can be a bit overwhelming trying to consume all the zucchini and yellow summer squash coming out of our gardens without wasting any. It’s the season of trying to dump as much summer squash as possible into your neighbors hands while trying to avoid taking theirs, like a big game of hot potato (or hot squash, as the case may be).

"Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence - "Courge musquée" squash gourd" by fr:User:Spedona - fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence – “Courge musquée” squash gourd” by fr:User:Spedona – fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

 

Fortunately, the middle of September is when we start to see a transition from summer squash, like zucchini, patty, and yellow squash (generally of the species Cucurbita pepo), to more winter squash varieties like butternut and acorn (in the US, mostly C. moschata, with some C. pepo mixed in for good measure). Winter squash differ from summer squash in that they generally mature to the point where they have a hard and inedible outer rind before they are picked and eaten. This helps these hardy plants survive the colder weather of Cascadian autumn and winter. Their different physiology also gives them a different taste and different cooking applications. While zucchini is best sliced and sautéed (at least in my opinion), nothing beats a good mashed butternut squash with honey and butter.

"Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2" by George Chernilevsky - Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2” by George Chernilevsky – Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

 

Thanks to their hard outer rinds, winter squash varieties have extremely long shelf lives. If you buy a prime acorn squash in good condition, it can keep for up to two months if it is stored in a cool (around 50 degrees F), dry place away from direct sunlight. Just make sure not to store them in a refrigerator, as this actually makes the squash go bad more quickly. This comes in very handy for busy Seattleites who don’t want to waste their produce, and makes winter squash a great standby food that you can save for when you really need it.

 

Keep an eye out for this week’s recipe, which includes butternut squash (but I won’t give it away yet!)

 

Happy harvesting.

 

 

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Butternut Squash Risotto

 

Ingredients:Image

 

  • 2 ounces bacon
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 cup short grain rice, such as arborio or carnaroli
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 medium butternut squash, halved, seeded, peeled and cut into ½” chunks
  • 1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped
  • ¼ cup cream

Directions:

  • Cook bacon in large saucepan over medium-high heat until fat renders and is browned and almost crisp. Using slotted spoon or tongs, transfer to medium bowl.
  • Add oil to same saucepan, then onion and garlic; cook until onion is translucent, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Add rice; stir 1 minute.
  • Add hot broth; increase heat and bring to boil. Add squash and sage; reduce heat to medium and simmer until rice is tender but still firm to bite and mixture is creamy, stirring often, about 15 minutes.
  • Stir in cream and bacon. Season to taste with salt and pepper.