Tag Archives: acorn squash

Crispy Garlic Asparagus with Whipped Potato & Squash

Hello harvesters!

Check out a delicious new dinner recipe that the whole family will love. This is a classic comfort food type dinner, with a bit of spicing up. Guaranteed to help get your kids to eat their veggies!

Crispy Garlic Asparagus with Whipped Potato and Squash

IMG_2236

Ingredients:

3 medium potatoes, cut into 1 inch cubes (preferably Yukon gold, but other varieties will work)

½ butternut squash, cut into 1 inch cubes (about 2 cups)

1 bunch (about 2 lbs. asparagus)

1 T. brown sugar

3 T. butter

3 large garlic cloves, finely diced

1/3 cup cream

1 Tsp. salt, plus more to taste

Directions

Peel and cube potatoes and butternut squash. Steam squash and potatoes together until a knife is easily inserted, about 20 minutes. Place steamed squash in mixing bowl and add 2 T. butter, set aside.

Place 1 T. butter in skillet on medium-high heat. Remove tough ends of asparagus (about 1-2 inches) and add to skillet with ½ the diced garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally for about 5 minutes, then add left over garlic and a few pinches of salt. Cook until asparagus is softened, but still slightly crunchy (about 10 minutes). Remove from heat.

Combine cream, brown sugar, and salt in liquid measuring cup and warm in microwave, about 1 minute. While mixing the potatoes and squash with a hand mixer, pour in cream mixture until smooth (you can also use a ricer and stir in the cream).

Lay asparagus over desired amount of potato-squash mixture. Enjoy!

Serves 4-6

Original recipe and photo for Pacific Coast Harvest by Kayla Waldorf

Sign up for organic produce delivery today! 

cropped-pch-full-logo-page-01-e1390163424123

 

Delicious Stuffed Squash Entree

This week’s recipe from our good friend Kayla Waldorf brings together three of our favorite foods- caramelized onions, sauteed mushrooms, and sweet winter squash. This is a hearty, filling entree for a winter meal with the family.

Chevre & Brown Rice Stuffed Acorn Squash with Sautéed Mushrooms

IMG_1529

Ingredients

2 acorn squash, halved

1 ½ cups brown rice

3 cups veggie broth

8 oz. Crimini mushrooms, cut into small cubes

1 large onion, diced

½ cup walnuts, chopped

3 tbsp. balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp. butter

4 oz Chevre (3 for the stuffing, 1 for the top)

 

Method

Preheat oven to 375. Halve acorn squash and remove seeds. Place upside down in glass baking dish, fill with ¼ inch water, and loosely cover with tin foil. Bake for 40 minutes.

 

While squash is baking, cook rice. Rinse rice and place in pot, cover with 3 cups veggie broth and bring to a boil. Once rice is boiling, reduce heat and simmer for 20-30 minutes until rice is tender (do not stir).

 

While rice is cooking, preheat large pan on medium heat and melt butter. Once pan is preheated, add onions. Stir constantly until onions caramelize (they will turn a rich brown color and become very translucent). Once onions are caramelized, add 3 tablespoons balsamic and cook (stirring continuously) until mushrooms are soft and vinegar is thick. Feel free to add more vinegar if you like the flavor. Mix in chopped walnut, 3 oz. chevre and about salt and cayenne pepper to taste.

 

When squash is done, remove from oven and increase temperature to 400. Flip over so the bowl-shaped side is facing up (cut off the bottoms to create a flat surface). Distribute stuffing evenly between squash and top with the remainder of the chevre. Bake for another 15 minutes until the cheese on top begins to brown. Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for Pacific Coast Harvest by Kayla Waldorf

 

Click below and sign up today!

PCH_logo

A Cornucopia of Cucurbita (Say that 6 Times Fast)

Hello Harvesters

Pacific Northwest produce lovers have a love-hate relationship with our squash. Towards the end of the summer, it can be a bit overwhelming trying to consume all the zucchini and yellow summer squash coming out of our gardens without wasting any. It’s the season of trying to dump as much summer squash as possible into your neighbors hands while trying to avoid taking theirs, like a big game of hot potato (or hot squash, as the case may be).

"Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence - "Courge musquée" squash gourd" by fr:User:Spedona - fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Musquée de Provence – “Courge musquée” squash gourd” by fr:User:Spedona – fr:Image:Courge_musquée01.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Musqu%C3%A9e_de_Provence_-_%22Courge_musqu%C3%A9e%22_squash_gourd.jpg

 

Fortunately, the middle of September is when we start to see a transition from summer squash, like zucchini, patty, and yellow squash (generally of the species Cucurbita pepo), to more winter squash varieties like butternut and acorn (in the US, mostly C. moschata, with some C. pepo mixed in for good measure). Winter squash differ from summer squash in that they generally mature to the point where they have a hard and inedible outer rind before they are picked and eaten. This helps these hardy plants survive the colder weather of Cascadian autumn and winter. Their different physiology also gives them a different taste and different cooking applications. While zucchini is best sliced and sautéed (at least in my opinion), nothing beats a good mashed butternut squash with honey and butter.

"Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2" by George Chernilevsky - Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

“Cucurbita moschata Butternut 2012 G2” by George Chernilevsky – Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Cucurbita_moschata_Butternut_2012_G2.jpg

 

Thanks to their hard outer rinds, winter squash varieties have extremely long shelf lives. If you buy a prime acorn squash in good condition, it can keep for up to two months if it is stored in a cool (around 50 degrees F), dry place away from direct sunlight. Just make sure not to store them in a refrigerator, as this actually makes the squash go bad more quickly. This comes in very handy for busy Seattleites who don’t want to waste their produce, and makes winter squash a great standby food that you can save for when you really need it.

 

Keep an eye out for this week’s recipe, which includes butternut squash (but I won’t give it away yet!)

 

Happy harvesting.

 

 

Click below and sign up today!

PCH_logo

Acorn Squash Curry

Ingredients: acorn curry

  • 1 acorn squash
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3 carrots, peeled and cut into ½” chunks
  • 2 butterball potatoes, cut into 1/2” chunks
  • ½ onion, sliced
  • 1 (13.5 oz) can coconut milk
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons curry powder
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chili pepper flakes
  • 1 tablespoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 400°F.  Halve an acorn squash, scoop out the seeds, and set skin side up on a jelly roll pan coated with vegetable oil.  Bake for 30 minutes and let cool.  Peel, and cut into cubes.
  • In a large pot, place acorn squash, carrots, potatoes, onion, coconut milk, water, curry powder, soy sauce, chili pepper flakes, turmeric, sea salt (to taste), and sugar over medium heat.  Stir to combine. After about 20 minutes, turn heat to low.
  • Cook until potatoes are fork-tender.  Serve with brown or white rice.

Quinoa-and-Corn-Stuffed Acorn Squash

Ingredients:Image

  • 1 small acorn, halved and seeded
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1/4 cup quinoa
  • ½ cup corn
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon minced fresh thyme or 1 pinch dried thyme
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • Balsamic vinegar, for serving

Directions:

  • In a large pot, bring enough water to submerse corn to a boil. Peel corn and remove husk if necessary. Boil for 10-15 minutes or just until soft. Remove from boiling water and set aside to drain. Cut kernels from cob with a knife by standing the corn on its end and cutting down along the cob.
  •  
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and grease with vegetable oil or a cooking oil spray.
  • Brush cut sides of squash with 1 tablespoon oil, season with salt and pepper, and lay cut-side down on prepared baking sheet. Roast on lower-middle rack until tender, 45 to 55 minutes. Remove squash from oven and increase oven temperature to 450 degrees.
  • Meanwhile, bring 2 cups water to boil in small saucepan. Stir in quinoa and 1/4 teaspoon salt and cook until quinoa is tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  • Wipe saucepan dry, add remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and heat over medium heat until shimmering. Stir in corn and shallot and cook until softened and lightly browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in garlic, coriander, and thyme and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds.
  • Off heat, stir in cooked quinoa, 1/2 cup Parmesan, parsley, pine nuts, and butter. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Flip roasted squash over and scoop out flesh, leaving 1/8-inch thickness of flesh in each shell. Gently fold cooked squash into quinoa mixture, then mound mixture evenly in squash shells. (Stuffed squash can be covered loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerated for up to 4 hours. Finish and bake as directed, increasing baking time to 25 to 30 minutes.)
  • Sprinkle squash with remaining 1/4 cup Parmesan. Bake on upper-middle rack until cheese is melted, 5 to 10 minutes. Drizzle with balsamic vinegar to taste and serve.