Monthly Archives: October 2014

Fall Fruit Parfait

Hello everyone!

This week’s recipe will probably require a trip to the store, but we think it’s worth it. This is some of the best granola we’ve ever tasted! No store-bought brand can compare to the crunch of fresh-baked granola. Serve it with some fall fruit from our boxes this week.

Fall Fruit Parfait with Fresh Baked Granola

IMG_1303

Ingredients for Granola

3-4 cups rolled oats
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup pumpkin seeds
1/4 sesame seeds
1/3 cup coconut oil melted
1/2 cup maple syrup
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 cup dried fruit chopped (I like tart cherries, but raisins can be substituted to save money)
1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut

Ingredients for Single Serving of Parfait

1 cup chopped apples and pluots tossed with a pinch of cinnamon

½ cup plain yogurt

~1 tbsp honey

~1 tbsp shredded cocounut

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Mix oats, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, shredded coconut,  salt, melted coconut oil, and maple syrup in large bowl until ingredients are evenly coated. Spread evenly over a sheet pan. Sprinkle with brown sugar. Bake for 1-1.5 hours, stirring every 20 minutes until ingredients are golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool. Mix in dried fruit.

To make parfait, put chopped fruit in bottom of mason jar, top with yogurt, then granola, sprinkle with coconut and drizzle with honey. Can sit overnight, covered. This recipe is great to make ahead for a quick breakfast!

 

Enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo for PCH by Kayla Waldorf

 

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An Iconic Autumn Squash

Hello Harvesters

 

This week we are introducing our Jack O’Lantern pumpkins for sale on our online market. We will offer them for sale right up until the day before Halloween (our last delivery day that week). To go along with this new product, this week we’re going to take a look at the many different uses for pumpkins, as well as their history in agriculture and food.

 

By Martin Doege (Morn), uploaded to English WP on 2003-08-21 (Own work) [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Martin Doege (Morn), uploaded to English WP on 2003-08-21 (Own work) [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Pumpkins are a variety of winter squash, related to other cultivars like Butternut or Acorn squash. Their orange color and round, ribbed shape have become iconic symbols of the autumn harvest season. Pumpkins are native to North America and were an important source of food for native people and colonists alike. The squash has a wide variety of cooking applications- it can be roasted in chunks, pureed or mashed, and cooked into soups and pies. Growing up anywhere in the United States, it would be very difficult to avoid having pumpkin pie at some point in one’s life, as this dish is a massively popular fall delicacy. The coffee company Starbucks has capitalized on this tradition with their “pumpkin spice” latte (although, ironically, this drink doesn’t actually contain any pumpkin, and tastes instead of nutmeg, cinnamon, and ginger). The introduction of the pumpkin spice latte has led to a huge trend in food products flavored with the spices used for pumpkin pie.

 

By Frenchtowner [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Frenchtowner [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Pumpkins also have deep cultural resonances for people in North America. There is a long tradition in Britain and Ireland of carving vegetables such as turnip and rutabaga into lanterns during the Halloween season. These lanterns were supposed to ward off evil spirits. Immigrants from the British isles brought the practice to North America, where they began to use pumpkins instead, due to their easy availability and larger size. The image of a big orange pumpkin in a field symbolizes the turning of the season and the end of summer warmth and long days. Many American children have fond memories of going pumpkin-picking with their families to prepare for Halloween lantern-carving.

 

When you get your pumpkin this year, send us your best Halloween lantern photos and we will post them on social media! Have a great week, Harvesters.

 

 

 

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Wine-poached Pears for Dessert or Brunch

Hello Harvesters

This week’s recipe will help you use up some the pears that have been piling up in our kitchens. In this recipe, you will stew your pears in red wine with some orange slices. The stewed pears will be great as a dessert or as a brunch treat.

 

Red Wine Poached Pears Drizzled with Honey

stewedpearrecipe

Ingredients:

4 medium ripe pears

2 cups merlot (or some other dry red wine)

1 orange

½ lemon

1 tbsp. chopped ginger root

1 cinnamon stick

 

Method:

Combine wine, ginger, and cinnamon stick in medium-large saucepan. Add juice of orange and lemon and some slices of peel to the wine. Bring to a boil for 5 minutes. Skin pears (leaving stem intact) and cut off bottom to allow to sit flat in pan. Reduce wine to a simmer and set pears upright in pan. Cover and cook for 15 to 20 minutes rotating every 5 to allow for even cooking. Remove from heat, let cool, then place in fridge (pan and all) for 3 hours or longer (the longer they sit, the more they will absorb the flavors).

Here are a couple options for serving- for a basic recipe, serve with a few dollops of yogurt, drizzle with warm honey, and sprinkle a bit of cinnamon over the yogurt for a garnish. If you want to make it a bit more complex, try making a maple syrup reduction. Bring 1 cup pure maple syrup to a simmer in a small sauce pan and reduce to about 1/2 cup. One warning- don’t allow the syrup to boil, and make sure to stir constantly to avoid burning the syrup to the bottom of the pan. Drizzle over the pears and enjoy!

 

Original recipe and photo by Kayla Waldorf

 

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Pear Season Rolls Around Again

We’re beginning to pass back into pear season here in the northwest, and this is really exciting for us at Pacific Coast Harvest. Pears a great fruit to have in the fall- they are sweet and nutritious, a good balance for winter crops like kale and potatoes, and have a long shelf life. We’re fortunate enough to live in the most productive regions in the United States for growing pears. According to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center, a USDA-funded information center, Washington and Oregon together grow about 75 percent of the whole US crop. This makes pears relatively cheap and available here, and we are the better for it. Most of our pears at Pacific Coast Harvest come from the European pear cultivars, which include Bosc, Bartlett, and D’Anjou. These are the most common varieties in this part of the world, though there are also Nashi (or Asian) pears and the Chinese white pear.

 

This image compares several different common types of European pear:

By Agyle (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Agyle (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

from left to right- Bartlett, Red Bartlett, Star Krimson, D’Anjou, Bosc, Comice, Concorde, and Seckel. 

 

There are many great ways to use besides eating them fresh. They make great ingredients in grilled panini with brie, chutney, and pie. You can even simmer them in red wine to make a spiced wine pear! Of course, they are also great fresh on salads, with cheese, or just in plain slices. Pear is also a fantastic fruit for making cider- pear ciders tend to be tart, crisp and very flavorful.

 

Stay tuned for an original pear recipe sometime soon on this blog. Let us know which is your favorite type!

 

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Roasted Kabocha Squash Bisque w/ Herbed Croutons

Hello Harvesters

This week’s recipe uses a new kind of squash from Skylight farms that we have in our Veggie and Washington boxes. It’s called Kabocha squash, and it’s common in Japanese and Korean cuisine. The Kabocha has a very sweet flavor, even sweeter than Butternut, and it can be used just like any other winter squash. Give this recipe a try and let us know what you think!

"Kabocha Cut Open 29September2005" by Namayasai LLP - Namayasai LLP, East Sussex, England. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kabocha_Cut_Open_29September2005.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Kabocha_Cut_Open_29September2005.jpg

“Kabocha Cut Open 29September2005” by Namayasai LLP – Namayasai LLP, East Sussex, England. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kabocha_Cut_Open_29September2005.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Kabocha_Cut_Open_29September2005.jpg

Roasted Kabocha Squash Bisque with Herbed Croutons

Ingredients:

For soup:

1 large kabocha squash

1 medium onion

2 tablespoons olive oil

4-8 oz. heavy cream

12 oz. veggie broth

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1-2 teaspoons salt

For croutons:

3 cups cubed bread (French baguette is ideal, but any bread will do. Stale bread is always a good option)

2 tablespoons olive oil

Salt, pepper, and thyme to taste (go heavy on the seasoning, as these are an accent)

Directions

For Soup:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Peel and dice Kabocha squash and dice onion. Toss with olive oil and spread on baking sheet, roast for about 40 minutes or until squash is soft. Let cool for 15 minutes, then puree in blender or food processor with veggie broth. Transfer to pot and add cream (4 to 8 ounces, depending on how creamy you want the bisque). Heat on medium head until soup is warm, but do not allow to boil. Add salt and cayenne.

For Croutons:

Place oven on broil. Toss cubed bread with olive oil, salt, pepper, and thyme and spread on baking sheet. Broil for about 5 minutes or until croutons are browned. Serve on top of warm soup.

 

Enjoy!

 

Original recipe for PCH by Kayla Waldorf

 

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